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RHETORICAL TROPE #6: Anthimeria

These days, the use of “anthimeria” is so common that its existence as a specific trope goes almost as unnoticed as the term itself. We do it whenever we use an adjective as a noun, or a noun as a verb, and so on. The most common form of anthimeria, by far, is the verbification […]

Infographic on How a Book is Published

Author Mariah Bear prepared this chart for the blog at Weldon Owen Publishing. The original post, and the resulting comments, made be found here. Our own contact in the book publishing world informs us that this is, in fact, a very accurate – if over-simplified – descripution of the realities of getting a book onto […]

Great Video “The Power of Words” from Andrea Gardner for her Book “Change Your Words, Change Your World”

We’ve watched this video several times. It’s beautifully produced and photographed, and it makes its point clearly and simply. It should make people think. Part of what impressed us is its demonstration of how rhetoric – because that what this is about – can be used to influence people to ends other than political or […]

COGNITIVE BIAS #122: Attentional Bias

When we reach a decision or conclusion without considering all of the contributing factors and possible outcomes, attentional bias has been allowed to influence our deliberations. A simple example of this bias (as well as a tool for avoiding it) is demonstrated with the use of a matrix to enumerate all the possibilities of a […]

RHETORICAL SCHEME #57: Perissologia

Strictly speaking, perissologia (from the Greek περισσολογία) is not a tool of expression or persuasion; it is the fault of excessive wordiness, of prolixity, garrulousness, verbosity, of superfluity or redundancy in speech or writing, of belaboring a point or beating a dead horse. It’s also a fault of indirection, of circumlocution, evasiveness, of beating around […]

COGNITIVE BIAS #1: Introspection Illusion

Carved into the stones of the temple of Apollo at Delphi were three proverbs. These include “Μηδέν άγαν” or “Nothing in excess” and ”Ἑγγύα πάρα δ’ἄτη” or “Make a pledge and mischief follows.” But the most well-known is “Γνῶθι σεαυτόν” or “Know thyself.” Which is easier said than done, according to psychologists. As it turns […]